Sunday, 10 June 2018

Lacock 10k


I wasn't really feeling it this morning when the alarm went off at 6.30 so we could drive to Lacock for Relish Running's10k. M has been recovering from a hip injury and my toe has kept me off running for the last ten days, so we were both a bit meh about the whole thing.

Once we got there, there was a bit of a wait for the start while various waves of half marathon and 5k runners went off. I was starting to feel cold and we were both keen to get going. We felt a tad grumpy about the whole thing.



The RD's briefing was repeated for each separate wave of runners so by the time we came to hear it we'd listened to it several times. Lots of detail is no good at race briefings. People listen for the first few minutes then start to switch off and talk to their friends so you can't hear properly anyway. They really don't need to do more than draw your attention to any hazards on the route.




Anyway, finally we were off, running down closed lanes out of Lacock and past the Abbey. It was pretty muggy. I had decided I would run with my hydration vest, overkill for a 10k in some ways, but I don't like to gulp down a cup of water from the stations, it gives me a stitch, slows me down and I always end up spilling half of it. This way, I can drink sips from the off when I need to and it allows me to keep up a good, steady pace without breaking my rhythm.

We soon caught up with the slower 5k runners, people who were new to running and finding the distance and the heat hard work. I find it almost impossible to run past slower runners on a race and not call out a word of encouragement, so I was egging them on whenever I could. Almost all of them replied with a thank you, and some started running again. It does make a difference hearing an encouraging word or someone telling you you can do it when you're struggling on a race.

Lacock has to be one of the prettier settings for a race that we've done. The olde world charm of the village always impresses me. I particularly love this old barn in the centre of the village.




Lacock is two laps, which I quite like. I realised I was running faster than I have in a while over that distance, and, once I'd got the first three miles under my belt and warmed up, also realised I was fine at that pace. A lady called Kate and I ran most of the race together, sometimes she was in front, then I'd overtake her on the hills and I'd be in front. We had a few chats as we ran along, and I ended up encouraging her to run a marathon :o).

There was a ford towards the end of the laps. The first time I avoided it, the second, at about half a mile from the finish, I knew I could make up a few places if I ran straight through the water, so that's what I did, except I hadn't realised how slippery the cobbles were. Luckily I stayed upright. It was a case of gritting your teeth and praying! The cool feet were welcome though :o)





I swung back into Lacock village at the top end of the high street and ran down the hill feeling that I had very little left in the tank but probably just enough to keep ahead of Kate who I could hear on my heels. Because she was local lots of people were cheering for her so I knew where she was. She came round the corner on my coat tails and, drawing level said 'come on! we can do this!' which made me smile. I pointed to a lady just in front of us in a pink top and told Kate we would overtake her, so we pushed on together and got past. Then there were two more ladies in front and I pushed on to get past them and then two men who were on the finish field whom I also passed. By now I'd turned the final corner and could see the finish gantry up ahead. People were cheering and I could see M waving (having finished ten minutes earlier than me) and calling go on! go on! behind you! behind you! I've no idea whether there really was anyone behind me but it had the desired effect and I sprinted to the finish, overtaking one more person before I crossed the line. M knows me well :o)

All in all it was a good race. My time was 53 or thereabouts, by far my fastest 10k for a while. Two weeks after a marathon I'll take that. More importantly, I wasn't tired (although felt the obligatory few seconds of sick and faint when I stopped, just to prove I'd been working for it). I realised as I went through the finish funnel that an old friend, Matt, was collating the numbers so stopped and had a quick hug and how are you before M and I went off to get our medals and something to eat. I had a curly wurly and picked up a twix to give to L for later. It's a standing joke between us that I run the distances and he gets the chocolate bar/ water bottle/ whatever else is in the goody bag afterwards :o) My toe was fine so I think that's now behind me, which means I can get on with training for marathon # 2 in August.



Happy Days!

Hope all are well?

CT.








16 comments:

  1. What a beautiful medal. I would wear it as a brooch or necklace if not so big. If I dressed up for work and didn't always wear tee shirts and pants. Or I would frame it without ribbon as a art piece.
    Happy to hear you felt good after the run and gross toe is fine !
    M's "grumpy face" looks very intriguing like a CSI Investigator, History Professor or Mystery Writer.

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Parsnip, thank you- you’ve made me look at the medal with new eyes. I am a bit guilty of dismissing them unless they really stand out.

      Delete
  2. Well done for holding your own on the cobbles. There seems to be a recurrent theme with you persuading people to run marathons! X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, because I know people have it in them and sometimes all it takes to realise that is someone else saying ‘you can do it’. I hate to think of people not trying something because of a fear of failure xx

      Delete
  3. I feel the cobbles would have been my undoing....I can hear the splash now lol. 53 minutes, what a brilliant time and with that dodgy toe. The medal is great. I’m going to have to do another 10 K soon as I’ve just realised my race for life medal doesn’t have a distance on it!
    Hope you have a great week getting back into training. B x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That’s no good at all- you run the distance, you want something that says it, loud and clear. I wondered how long it would be before the racing big nipped you again! (Half marathon.....😊) xx

      Delete
  4. Glad your toe is better, I saw a picture of it on your last post, that was one sore toe! In the distant future, when I'll be running again, I hope I'll have someone like you passing and encouraging me along x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Come and do a race down here, Christina, and I’ll cheer you on 😉 x

      Delete
  5. What a lovely place for a run. I love the grumpy pre-race photo, and I'm glad that your toe held up well too. Lucky L getting the chocolate without having to do the run!xx

    ReplyDelete
  6. Brilliant, well done you, glad the toe held up okay. Lacock is lovely isn't it, hope you got to have a look round while you were there. CJ xx

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lacock is such a pretty place and you had a medal to match too!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well done, that's a great time. And Lacock looks very pretty. Very glad that toe is ok - it looked very sore! S xx

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well done- a cracking time so soon after your marathon!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Cracking running as ever CT. And what a gorgeous setting. I do like a nice view when I'm running, it distracts from the pain somewhat ;-) xxx

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x