Monday, 12 March 2018

Proof That Badgers Don't Hibernate In Snow & That Woodcock Like Peanuts




I put the wildlife camera out during the recent snow and promptly forgot about it. Today I've been out to retrieve it. Quite pleased with the results. The woodcock is a first for me on any camera. I'd never have got the shot without a remote motion-activated one attached to a tree. The nearest I normally get to woodcock is when they explode at my feet, utterly hidden thanks to their cryptic camo until I nearly tread on them and they shoot up into the air. He is a bit gorgeous, don't you think?

The temperature reading on the camera for that pictures shows -5. There is an accompanying video which rather delightfully shows him probing through the snow for the peanuts in shells I'd put out for the badgers, which lie buried under about 4 inches of the white stuff. Just shows how hard it is for birds in those conditions.

The other two photos are of the bodgers. Also out in very low (minus) temperatures and ferreting about in the snow for the peanuts. If anyone insists on telling you that badgers hibernate through winter you can put them right (with photographic evidence) now :o)

BTW, ignore the date on the bottom pics, I'd put new batteries in the camera and forgot to reset it, and the time is also wrong for the same reason!

Hope you're all well,

CT :o)

23 comments:

  1. I have to look up Woodcock. I do not know what they are. I couldn't find the video ?
    Love Badgers and I am happy you put some food out for them. Just a bit so they can fuel up during the freezing icy weather.

    cheers, parsnip

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  2. What a fantastic surprise. I did worry about all the wild things back in the cold snap. Except the Bewick's swans, they were in their element. All off back to Siberia now though I think. Sand martins have arrived, spring maybe? CJ xx

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  3. Love the woodcock, I’ve never had the privilege. I must put our field camera back out after seeing all the tracks in the snow. Who knew so much happens at night, it’s like bloomin’ Clapham Junction.

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  4. What wonderful pictures. I don't think I've ever seen a woodcock. R spotted badgers in the garden a while ago. I'm tempted to put out peanuts, but I'm not sure that I want to encourage them - they did make rather a mess with their digging! xx

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  5. How much wood would a woodcock cock, if a woodcock could cock wood?

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  6. I was surprised to find that the bears in Bern (mum dad and 2 kids)were in hibernation when I was there last week. They could be seen on the monitor to be gently stirring in their cave.

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  7. Woodcock must have a heavier beak than body...surprised they don't fall forwards all the time! x

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  8. A woodcock! Lucky you. They are fabulous birds. Did I tell you I saw a lapwing the other day? Just one, though, doing it's lovely flappy flight over a field. Haven't seen one for years. Badgers only in evidence around here because of bodies at the sides of the roads - very sad. S x

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  9. How cool, a wildlife camera! I fancy having one of them. I don't think either of those two creatures are city dwellers but a wildlife camera here would capture plenty of foxes and the odd deer, too. x

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  10. What a wonderful surprise to see the badgers. There is always evidence of badgers around here in the winter. We bought a wildlife camera before Christmas, it is lovely to discover the wildlife we don't see. Sarah x

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  11. Brilliant photos. I might have guessed you’d have a wildlife camera. B x

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  12. How fantastic! Your photos remind me of Wind in the Willows and Badger tucked up in the snowy wood. One of our wildlife rescue services picked up an injured badger last week and have had great success with his care. Absolutely beautiful creatures. xx

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  13. One dark evening coming home I met a badger. In fact we passed each other going in opposite directions on the pavement. It was a surreal experience. We could almost have wished each other good night.

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  14. Thanks for all your comments everyone. Sorry not to reply individually- we have no internet at home so I am without blogability 😬. CT

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  15. What gorgeous photos, I've also got a Bushnell wildlife cam but confess to being very lazy with it.

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  16. It must be a great fun to observe wild animals.

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  17. You are so lucky to have a woodcock in your garden.
    I can but dream.
    Yes, its amazing how many people think badgers hibernate.
    we have just come back from Cornwall and I was saddened to see many injured badgers on the road.
    Some were juveniles :(

    Lovely post

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  18. I love badgers and your photo's are lovely. I live in hope that at some point will be near to our house.

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  19. I fear many of the badgers you see at the side of the road will have met their end elsewhere and are dumped so that people will think it’s cars rather than humans. The damage that TB causes dairy farmers mean that feelings run high, it’s not a subject I would raise in a country pub.

    I have seen two woodcock in the last week, one flying over my house the other on a walk nearby. They are the first I have seen along with redwings. Must be the very cold weather.

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x