Wednesday, 16 April 2014

The First Humming Bird Hawk-Moth of 2014!!!!!!!!!

Forgive a second post in such quick succession but I had to tell you all that I saw my first Hummingbird Hawk Moth of the year today while we were out walking at Magdalen Hill. It's the first one for the Hill for the year too, and I've reported the sighting to Butterfly Conservation's Migrant Watch and also to the local branch.

No photo, because he took off sharpish, but how exciting is that? (well, it is to me. L thinks I am Quite Mad and no amount of explaining the significance of the sighting to him will shift him from that position).

Here is a pic of the one who visited our garden last year. Today's was a lot smaller. I'm assuming he had flown here from North Africa, but there is some suggestion that a few are over-wintering here as it gets milder. HBHMs are indicator species for climate change because they are extending their reach Northward, hence the importance of recording the sightings.

Our Summer Visitor, 2013

I had better luck with flutter pics today as well. This is my first Green Veined White of the year. A female, judging from the heavier markings and spotting on the wings....



I'll leave you with some shots of the Cowslips up on Magdalen and some of the countryside around the hill. Have a Great Evening All. CT :-)

A meadow of Cowslips

From Magdalen Hill towards Deacon's Hill
Cowslips
 

24 comments:

  1. HI CT I am very pleased for you. I can tell you are very excited. perhaps you will see another and get a photos of it. I have not seen many butterflies at all

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    1. HUGELY excited, but then you know me and moths Margaret :-)

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  2. Well I for one am QUITE excited to see the hummingbird moth !
    The hummingbird moth and the Luna moth are my all time favorites , among moth favorites.

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    1. I'll get the moth box out at night again before long and hopefully be able to show you more- they are super creatures :-)

      ps- don't forget your tortoise post x

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  3. You are not alone when finding yourself excited to see a hummingbird moth. I know many places in the countryside to find hummingbirds depending on the season, but a hummer moth is a rare and exquisite find! I've never been able to get a good photo of the ones I've come across, but just seeing them is awesome enough.

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    1. I was OVER THE MOON to see him- couldn't quite believe my eyes in fact, it was so unexpected and such a surprise. My husband took a picture of me because he said I was grinning all over my face :-)

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  4. Wow, so good to see the humming bird hawk moth. We used to get a lot of them when we had an abundance of honeysuckle but since the removal of the plant I haven't seen one, aren't they pretty?
    Briony
    x

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    1. Ah, get some more honeysuckle Briony - apparently they remember the location of the flowers they've visited and can find their way back to them time and again. Super, beautiful, amazing, wonderful creatures (I am still excited- can you tell?) xx

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  5. The cowslips are beautiful! Glad that you got your moth sighting! I understand how these things that are exciting and important to you are often not to others! We get it! xx

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    1. I don't think I've ever seen so many Cowslips in once place before- a sea of yellow. :-)

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  6. Hi, I've been reading your blog for a while now, but never posted a comment! Just wanted to say how much I have enjoyed reading it, always interesting and sometimes funny!! Love how you are so excited about moths, I have to admit I had never really thought about moths before I started reading your blog, but now see them in a different light!!, there are so many and some are amazing. I want to tell you that I helped a bee in distress in our garden yesterday, I think it was just exhausted, so I picked it up, gave it some honey, like I'd seen on your blog and within 10 minutes or so it was revived and buzzing on its way!!! Brilliant, and all thanks to your blog. Look forward to reading and commenting more.
    Thanks again
    Linda O xxx

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    1. Hi Linda and thanks for your lovely comment. I am so pleased you were able to help the bee and really pleased my blog gave you some useful tips. I'll be putting the moth box out over the weekend so will hopefully have some more interesting moth people to show you. As the weather warms more and more of them appear- it won't be long before the exotic brightly coloured ones. Have a lovely day. CT :-)

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  7. My sister took a picture of Humming bird moth some years ago here in North Wales after it buzzed around her cottage garden for some time. Ever since I've kept my eyes open but, to my dissapointment, have never come across one so it is indeed a pleasure to see your photograph.
    Never heard of a 'moth box', so I'm finding curiosity aroused as to what manner of contraption this be.
    John

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    1. It be a new-fangled big plastic tub with a ferociously bright light bulb on its top to attract the mothy folk inside. In the morning you lift the lid and hope that all the moths don't fly out before you've taken their pictures and worked out what they are :-)

      Get some tubey flowers for your garden (or new allotment plot :-) ) as HBHMs like those types of flowers especially (jasmine, honeysuckle, fuschia, runner bean flowers).

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    2. Why thank e for the tips me dear.

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  8. So exciting re the Hummingbird Hawkmoth :) The cowslips look beautiful. You are so fortunate to live near such a great reserve :)

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    1. I knew you'd understand! Magdalen is a lovely place and I fully intend to make more use of it this year. I'm doing my transects there from May onwards :-)

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  9. Wow that hummingbird Hawkmoth is really spectacular. I shall keep a look out for one around the wild honeysuckle. I would like to grow some wild cowslips in the meadow.
    Lovely post.

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    1. They are quite something, and when you know they've flown up from Africa they seem all the more amazing :-)

      I'm growing cowslips next year for sure.

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  10. I remember seeing a Hummingbird moth when I was about 9, I thought I had seen a Humming bird, there was no Internet then and there was very few people would have known there was a moth like this... On a by-pass near us the roundabout is planted with wild flowers, at the moment it is FULL of Cowslips..looks amazing.

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    1. HBHMs look like nothing else, almost as if they aren't somehow real. I saw my first one last year and was so made up, I didn't stop grinning for days :-)
      How great to have a roundabout full of wild flowers. I hope other councils take note- a great opportunity to help the wildlife.

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  11. That is very exciting! I didn't see one at all last year, so I've high hopes for this year. The meadow of cowslips is beautiful.

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    1. I was so surprised to see him. I hope we get one visiting the garden here this summer again. Amazing creatures.

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x