Thursday, 16 January 2014

The Saga Of The Broken Wrist Continues and Whoopee! L's Blanket Wool Has Arrived

It's worse than we thought.

So said the Consultant when we saw him yesterday. What we'd been considering a minor irritation which would heal up in 6 weeks and be forgotten about turns out to have potentially 'catastrophic' (his word, not ours) consequences.

Basically, M has fractured the corner of the Radius (which we knew), but (and this is the nasty bit) he also has three fracture lines running down into his arm which means that section of bone could drop at any point, leaving the surface of the joint uneven and unstable. If that happens there is a chance he could lose the use of that hand.

Bit sobering.

Hearing this direct from the Consultant at least meant that when I suggested it would be a Good Idea to Moderate Behaviour Significantly for the next few weeks (ie no running, or cycling, or trips on crowded trains where jostling (which would not be at all good) might occur), it couldn't be put down as Unnecessary Wifely Fussing and therefore dismissed. This makes looking after him that much easier.

I feel so sorry for him: for an active man this is a very frustrating experience, with the added worry now of potential long-term consequences. It means two running races he's been training for and looking forward to are now out the window, including a league where he's been doing well. His training at the local running club is on hold and our annual trip down to the Grizzly in March won't now be happening either.

We have another appointment at the hospital next week, this time at the specialist hand clinic where they will be able to tell us more, including whether he needs an operation (although the Consultant said this type of break is such a tricky one that an op and pinning is often not much use anyway).

I feel we are getting to know our local hospitals Very Well Indeed. I was not without some previous knowledge of two of them (I suspect most Mothers Of Boys have a reasonably intimate acquaintance with their local hospital at some point), but there are three within our vicinity and I hadn't been to the other one before. It has a rather fetching ancient chapel stuck outside it; a relic from another time marooned in a network of modern roads and buildings. I found its presence reassuring- it was calm and peaceful and somehow timeless beside the nerve-jarring flashing wail of the ambulances and the stricken-faced groaning of various broken patients. 

We've spent several hours over the last two days stalking the various corridors and waiting rooms of two of our local hospitals, and judging by the exorbitant rates they charge for parking we're probably also single-handedly supporting the entire car-parking staff for the rest of this year. 

The hospital staff have been fantastic. Most of them have a sense of humour, they've been thorough and careful, answered all my questions (and I always have a lot, being a healer and therefore keen to know everything I can so I can help M once we're home), and they've been on the ball about referring him on promptly. I know the NHS has it critics, I know an appointment time has about as much meaning as a weather forecast projecting twelve years ahead (I can personally testify on this score), but, despite the waiting around (and lets face it, even this has its upsides- I've read a lot more of my book in the last two days than I would normally have managed to do and extended my crossword knowledge significantly), the system does work. Were it not for the doctors and nurses doing what they did to identify, acknowledge and secure the break, M would be in a much worse position today than he is. So I applaud them and thank them from the bottom of my heart for all their care and diligence.

What a strange start to the New Year we are having. My day is now largely divided into dropping L at school, then M at work, then back to take the dogs out for a walk, then see patients in the middle of the day, then back to collect L from school and three hours later back out again to get M, and that's without all the usual household stuff of cooking and cleaning, or Poppy wee and poo trips into the garden every hour. Thank goodness I have these three weeks off college!

Accidents have a way of sharpening the mind onto focusing on the important things though, and, in a continuance of the theme I had set myself a couple of weeks ago, I am letting go of all the busy busy but unimportant elements of my existence (pruning, you might say) and concentrating on taking care of my husband.

Children grow up and leave home to make their own lives (I've always loved that expression about it being a parent's job to give your children 'roots and wings' - I think it says it all), but your husband walks by your side all the days of your life, and if you've got a good one as I have, this isn't onerous but a nice thing, and so I want to take care of him and do all I can to make sure he comes out of this as well as he possibly can, and with the use of that hand intact.



On a cheerier note, I got home from the hospital yesterday to find that the wool I'd ordered for L's blanket has arrived. There are 20 balls of 15 different colours, and it came in The Most Enormous bag. L was very keen to know what was in the enormous bag, although this faded once he realised it was just wool. I'm looking forward to starting on the blanket. It has the potential to be a lot neater than mine, except that I found myself wondering last night whether it should be. I think part of the joy of the other blanket is its lack of conformity. We'll see. Knitting projects are rather like writing a story- the characters develope with a mind of their own and before you know it, all plans have gone out the window. That's why I like writing, and why knitting projects are fun too.



 Anyway, I've rambled on enough. I'll leave you with a pic of one of the Bluetits taken this morning, and a rather sweet pic of Ted and Poppy. Pops is driving him mad at present- always wanting to play when he'd much rather be asleep in front of the fire, and licking his chops continually. I'd growl if it was me, but he just puts up with it, bless him.



Thank you all very much for your speedy healing messages- I have passed them on.

Hope everyone is well?

CT :-)

22 comments:

  1. Oh, that is rotten for M. Extra best wishes to him. Hopefully the specialist next week will have some good news.
    I love the different colours of the wool and that last photo of the two dogs is fabulous - so sweet.

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    1. Thanks Wendy. I'm keeping fingers crossed for good news. There's not much more we can do, except keep him out of harms way!
      That pic of the dogs says it all- Poppy adores her Ted, and Teddy is too kind to shove her off when she's being annoying!

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  2. Hi CT, well not a great start to 2014. I hope everything improves for you from now on. As you say the NHS staff (Clinical that is) do brilliant job, its all the managers and a paper shifters that cost the unnecessary expense. Hope your Husband repairs completely and soon. I use to run half marathons and know what its like have an enforced lay off.

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    1. Hi Roy. Thanks for the good wishes. He's pretty pi**ed off, as you can imagine, and if he didn't have the threat of it worsening I have no doubt he'd carry on cycling, running and probably competing too with it in a cast! :-)

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  3. I shall, with your permission, do my bit for the healing process of M's arm - very helpful seeing the x-rays as it gives a focus for visualisation.

    Beautiful wool - fun wool! Happy blanket knitting! Mine is about half complete and I am beginning to think that knitting is Nature's way of telling you to slow down and take stock of life.

    And even though I cannot see Ted's face,, I just know from the look of his back that he has exactly the same expression on his face that Phoebe has when FBM squishes up against her for a bit of warmth and kitty comfort!

    Thinking of you all. Xxx

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    1. That would be very much appreciated Mrs D, thank you.

      One feels that Ted and Phoebe could sympathise very easily with the annoying habits of their respective smalls.

      And I am so glad to have the knitting to keep me going peacefully at the present time xx

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    2. Meant to say- the damaged bone is the thicker one in the xray on the right xx

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  4. So sorry to here the bad news on M's wrist. I hope the news is more positive next week and I'm sure you will do a wonderful job in looking after him and helping in the process of healing.
    One of my colleagues went to A&E after work and he too had fractured his wrist too. Love the and picture of Teddy and Poppy! Sarah x

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    1. Thanks Sarah.
      Your poor colleague. I've since heard that lots of folks fell off their bikes on the ice on Tues. It must have been across the whole of the South coast. x

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  5. Oh goodness, take care both of you.

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  6. I feel awful for M, and hope he follows Doctor's orders and takes things easy. I hope he can keep the use of his hand, and i'm sorry the races he's tried so hard to tain for ate now off.

    The photo of your dogs is so adorable! :)

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    1. He's being a good patient so far. I think the 'catastrophic' potential got to him and he's been very careful since- phew! Hope all is well with you :-)

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  7. I'm so sorry to hear that the injury to M's wrist is worse than originally thought :( I do hope you get better news when you go to the specialist clinic next week. What a dreadful start to the year you have had. My thoughts are with you both.

    I do like your new blanket wool. I was in Hobbycraft yesterday looking for a new knitting bag but talked myself out of it when I saw the cost!! Was very tempted to buy some new wool too to make yet another scarf but decided I must finish the one I am knitting (yes I will post a photo!) and start blanket to use up box full of wool.

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    1. Thanks Caroline- it's so nice to hear everyone's good wishes, it makes a difference.

      You have more wool self control than I do- I'm finding it very hard to resist buying it at the moment, all the more because I keep telling myself I can use it up on the blankets! Looking forward to seeing your finished scarf. BTW I got a lovely knitting bag with owls on it from ebay- much more reasonably priced than in the shops x

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  8. What a nightmare - poor M and you too CT with all the running around. What will you do when College starts again? I hope it's flexible! Healing wishes indeed to M. Something I would say, if a serious negative can have any glimmer of positivity, is that, because this break is serious, the primary care will doubtless be fantastic. When I broke my neck and back, the consultant and intensive care staff were amazing. It was only when I left hospital that thing went quiet and worthy of complaint. It sounds like he's getting the best care possible so fingers and everything else crossed for a good outcome. xx

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    1. Life is a tad fraught at the mo Em, although I'm not feeling too stressed I think because I've pruned back on a lot of unnecessary stuff. We have lots of family and good friends living locally so if I get stuck with lifts etc once college starts they've all offered to help out, which is a relief. I agree re the primary care- when M smashed up his elbow the immediate treatment was amazing, after care left a little to be desired, as it did for my poor step-dad when he bust his leg last summer. Seems to be a common thread. Am not too worried about that because I can do a reasonable amount for him here. Thanks for all the good wishes my dear - it definitely makes a difference x

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  9. I hope you get a good result from the specialist and so sorry to hear it's such a bad break. The wool looks lovely. Poppy really looks like she knows what she's doing in that photo-such a cheeky look I think.

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    1. Fingers crossed for the specialist. I'll let you know how we get on.
      I've started knitting with the wool and it is lovely to work with. How are your blinds coming on?
      And you're right about Pops- she has us all wrapped round her paw! :-)

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    2. They're not! I have just ended up with so many things to do, sick pets, water and storm damage, other horrid business stuff-that's a pain to sort out and finally my op....so the conservatory blinds got left and are still folded up waiting for me to get my act together....I'm determined to do them as they are essential. Just waiting for a moment of inspiration and a burst of energy!

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  10. What a blow to have news of a more complicated fracture. I do hope that the hand clinic will be able to help, although it`s probably a case of time and care. M is lucky to have your love and support over the next weeks.
    Sending lots of positive thoughts and hoping that he is not on to much pain now.

    I love your blanket wool!

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    1. Thanks DW. Luckily pain is almost non-existent and he is getting used to the plaster and not being able to do as much as usual, but will still be very relieved when it's all healed up and hopefully back to normal! :-)

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x