Tuesday, 1 October 2013

Moth Target Of 300 For 2013 Beaten!!!!

Splendid.

305 New Moth Species have visited our Hampshire Garden since June 2013.

Last night was a Bumper Night as far as recent outings go for the Moth Box. Conditions must have been just about Moth Perfect because there were moths everywhere when I went outside to check this morning. As well as being inside and on the edges of the Moth Box, they were also hidden in the grass, tucked inside leaves, settled in crevices on the fence posts, hiding beneath the table and asleep on the wall and the windows.

There were lots of beautiful shapes and colours and amid them all a Grand Total of 8 New Species, which took my total over the Holy Grail of 300 I had set myself earlier in the year so I was Thrilled.

 Canary-Shouldered Thorn

Always a joy to see these. This one is fast asleep- no pupil visible in the eye



One of my all-time favourite moths: the Angle Shades

Awake- see the pupil? 


Angle Shades side view


The beautiful cape-like draped wings of the Angle Shades


A male Four-Spotted Footman

Much bigger than the other footmen




Barred Sallow (new species for me)

Apols for blurry pic- he was outside and it was the best I could get


Beaded Chestnut (new species)



Blair's Shoulder Knot (new species)



Broad Bordered Yellow Underwing



Black Rustic 

About 20 odd of these in the box today




Chestnut (new species)

Only just appearing here- lovely markings



Common Marbled Carpet

Sorry for blurry pic, but I wanted to show you the difference between this one and the one below



Dark Marbled Carpet

The angle of the marbling helps tell them apart because colour-wise they can be very similar indeed, although these two aren't.


Deep Brown Dart (new species)

A Very Handsome Moth don't you agree?



Feathered Thorn (new species)


Feathered Thorn head-on (I love the horns!)


I will never tire of showing you these astonishingly beautiful moths with their amazing markings: The Frosted Orange.


This Frosted Orange was asleep on a blade of grass, bless him.



A perfect Light Emerald, who was resting on a leaf outside in the garden. If you look closely you can just see a Sallow asleep on the leaf to the top right (it's the blob of yellowy/orange)



A Sallow

(lots and lots of these about- they are real Autumn moths)



Rosy Rustic



Another Sallow, this one more marked, hiding in a leaf




Variation on a theme: Pale Lemon Sallow (new species) wide awake and preparing for take off!


 And I've only just found this beautiful Blood Vein, fluttering around inside. She must have been here all day and escaped from the box before I noticed. I wonder who else is here that I haven't seen?



Hope you've enjoyed today's Magical Moths. It'll be Moth Season for a while yet- believe it or not there are moths who fly over winter, so there will be more to come. Wonder what the total will be by the end of the year?

I'll leave you with a picture of the Faithful Hound, who is scratching at the mo. I suspect fleas and rather think it's time for some new bedding for him....


Have a good evening all,

CT :-)

16 comments:

  1. Oh dear. Now I'm going to be going around looking each moth in the eye.. Those first two are brilliant. It is amazing the diversity within our moth population when we really look at them.

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  2. And that they aren't (contrary to a popularly held belief) all small and brown.... :-)

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  3. FABULOUS moths. They really are so beautiful and, yes, I love the Deep Brown Dart.

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    1. I've been thinking what amazing fabrics their colours and patterns could inspire. I still find it incredible to think this hidden world goes on around us every single night and we see so little of it.

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  4. Those moths are fantastic especially the first one. The faithful hound looks cute too!
    Sarah x

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    1. It's their rich variety that constantly amazes me. Such beautiful things- they deserve a better press than they get.
      Faithful hound is once more in need of a bath. He has more than a hint of the ragamuffin about him!

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  5. I raise a toast of..er, some toast ( am all out of mothylated spirits aha!) in honour of reaching your magnificent goal of mothiness!

    Congratulations! Hurrah! And thank you for introducing me to all the lovely Moth People, who, until a few months ago, I never knew existed. Hurrah! (Again!)

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    1. Very glad to have helped expand your knowledge Mrs. How is the crocheting going? I dived into the terrifying Knitting World Of Moss Stitch last night and am considering posting the resulting thing, for want of a better word. It should give everyone a good laugh (and you thought your triangle was bad!) :-)

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  6. Some great new moths in the post CT. I agree the Deep Brown Dart is a handsome beastie, and the Frosted Orange is so beautiful. Will there be any in the winter or does it depend on the temperature?

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    1. Apparently there are moths that fly over the winter, which seems hard to believe, but if there is one thing I have learnt about moths this year it is that they are tough little people. One flew into the gas ring when I was cooking last night. I really thought he was a gonner, but figured he'd be better off dying outside so I put him in the garden. When I checked later there he was perched on the window right as rain :-)

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  7. HI CT Congratulation on reaching your target. I say you will reach 350 by 31 Dec.! Now there a challenge! Fantastic shots of them all.

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    1. Ah! Another target to meet! It'll be very interesting to see what the final year total is, and of course I only started in June so we'd already missed half the year. Next year I will record from Jan onwards and get a more accurate picture. Would love to know what the moths types and numbers are like in Ireland :-)

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  8. Brilliant!! Well Done you!! I love blood veins! I don't see nearly so many moths now. Ted looks sweet. Bracken says hello! I know this because he is lying sprawled over my lap and licking my hands profusely!!

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    1. There are still some small day-flying moths about- look out for tiny triangular ones on Michaelmas daisies, they're called nettle taps. Ted says hi back to his blogging pal Bracken and hopes he is in fine fettle? :-)

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  9. Well done on reaching the target :) Some great photos of some lovely moths - Frosted Orange is particularly beautiful. So pleased you managed to trap Blair's Shoulder Knot :)

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    1. Yes I was really pleased having seen it on yours. Now we both need a MDJ and we'll be happy :-)

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x