Monday, 2 September 2013

Shifting Earth Energies And The Fruits Of The Land


The healing tradition that I am part of works very closely with the shifting patterns of energy in the earth. I have been aware, from a nagging sense, that I have not been paying sufficient attention to them recently. 

It's been a glorious summer and an active one, but over the last week I have found myself repeatedly taking my shoes off and walking barefoot over the grass. I wondered why, until I realised that it is because the energy of late summer (or Indian summer) is earth, and walking barefoot over the grass is the simplest way of re-connecting with it.

In days gone by the fire energy of the summer months was too much for my system and I would invariably get a migraine at the solstice and so looked forward to autumn when things cooled down as a result. As I have grown older I have got better at guarding against this and the fierce energy of summer doesn't undo me as it used to, although it has had an interesting effect on L and his friends who have become exhausted by the heat and complained of "not being able to think or function properly" as a result.

The energy of late summer is gentler; a good time to reflect back on all that has been achieved and a time to prepare for the coming winter. I like the sense of change and rejuvenation our seasons bring us here in the Northern Hemisphere and I try to live my life in accordance with them, shifting my own energies and expectations in line with the subtle changes that occur in the earth. And so I enjoy the sharpness in the air and the upsurge of a different kind of energy hinted at by the nights drawing in and I like the suggestion of frosts and falling leaves to come.

The moths know all about the seasons changing. They are fewer in number now and their species have altered over the last few weeks with an increasing number of autumnal colours to be found. For example, this Sallow was in the box this morning (along with 6 more hornets). I've never seen one before so was very pleased to get it. Its resemblance to an autumn leaf is evident I think.





Also in the box was this gorgeous Burnished Brass, who amply reflects the golden colours of early autumn when the late summer sun shines through the turning leaves.



I'm pretty sure this is a Common Wainscot, although a darker more autumnal version than its paler early summer relatives.



 Finally, t'is the season to Make Jellies. Here are the (so far) fruits of my labours.
 Mulberry....



Bullace & Apple



The bullace (wild plums) are from trees in the vineyard, which is now so overgrown it requires serious commitment to go hedgerow harvesting there, and the apples come from one of our trees in the garden. I have a pile of blackberries waiting to be jellied this evening. We eat the results as jam spread on toast, or as an accompaniment to meat. 
After the bramble jellies are done I shall be on the hunt for Rowan Berries, which make a fantastic bright orange jelly that goes well with roast meats and looks impressive in a jar.

Right, I'm off for another run now, because, unlike the first time when I couldn't walk for three days afterwards without wincing,  surprisingly I wasn't as stiff as a board after the last one and it turns out that sort of thing is Really Quite Encouraging when you're engaged on a new fitness regime.....

Wishing you all a peaceful evening, whatever you are doing.

CT :-)


14 comments:

  1. I really enjoyed this post CT, as I too share so many of your sentiments about this wonderful time of year and the coming of autumn. I also agree that there is something really quite therapeutic about walking bare foot on grass :-)

    We have mountains of blackberries, crab apples and all manner of produce to preserve up here at the moment (hence my lack of posts lately as we've been so busy), though I've never thought about using Rowan berries for jelly and might have to give it a go :-)

    I see your miles ahead as regard moth species now (we are currently at 225) and looking back at your posts you've had some gorgeous species lately (I am very envious of your Maiden's Blush and Pebble Hooktip) :-)

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    1. Hi David,
      How funny- I've just left you an almost identical comment on your blog! If you get some Rowans be sure to freeze them before cooking otherwise they are horribly tart. The freezing breaks down the whatever it is that causes the tartness (as per sloes I guess).

      I love the Maiden's Blush moth and the Pebble Hooktip. It has been truly fascinating to see them over the summer and watch the species come and go. I am as intrigued by moths now as I was when I started in June (more so), something I'm quite sure you'll understand! CT :-)

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  2. The jellies all look delicious and the moths are lovely. It is wonderful being aware of the seasons, isn't it? When I lived for a few years in London, I missed all the different changes I used to notice in the countryside.

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    1. I had a period of time living in a town once and couldn't bare not seeing the outline of trees silhouetted against the sky at dusk, or the "blue distance" you get with open fields and woods. I like the simple peace of the countryside. Interestingly, when towny friends come to stay they can't sleep for the lack of street lights and the calls of owls! All depends on what you're used to I guess, but I know which I prefer.

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  3. Your Jellies look absolutely delicious. Very envious of your access to mulberries - there are none round here and we just don't have the room for a tree. Are you starting your course soon?

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    1. My mother has a tree in her garden that no-one else uses the fruit from. They are picky things to collect though as they don't all ripen at once so you have to keep going back. Their delicious subtle flavour makes it worth the fiddliness.
      Course starts end of Sept. Three days a week. Looking forward to it with only mild trepidation! :-)

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  4. I, too, stuck my head out the window first thing yesterday morning and breathed in the change in the air. Lovely! I do like the switch from Summer to Autumn, although I think Summer is here for a while longer - no sign of falling leaves in the park yet.

    But the seasonal shift is definitely here to be embraced. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.

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    1. Absolutely! We all benefit from a shift in gear from time to time :-)

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  5. Lovely post CT. Living here I feel more in-tune with the seasons, I think this is because the winters don't seem so long and it's not as cold and damp. We look forward to spring and summer and plan our activities to suit the seasons. I always felt like we were fighting these before.
    Mulberry Jelly-yummy, there is a very old Mulberry Tree in Galmpton village and I went to visit the cottage under the open garden scheme last year.

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    1. It's great if you can be in harmony with your surroundings and make the most of what each different season offers. That way peace lies.
      I'd love to plant a mulberry here but not sure we have the space, so it may have to wait for my long-dreamed-about orchard in later years!

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  6. Great post CT. Love the Sallow moth by they way - another one I have never trapped.

    Your jellies look wonderful - we have a huge crop of rowan berries in the garden (best for years) so will have to try and find a rowan jelly recipe.

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    1. Remember to freeze the rowans before cooking otherwise they are horribly tart. I love this time of the year and all the lovely things you can make from nature's bounty :-)

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  7. I also enjoy changing seasons, as you saw in one of my posts recently. Although I had forgotten what it was like to have cold feet in bed! Hot water bottle time already! That burnished brass moth is spectacular!!

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    1. I'm wearing socks in bed at night and already have an extra blanket on my side! My hands are cold too- can't be time for gloves already, surely?!

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x