Friday, 22 March 2013

A thought for Friday

I've had a wobbly sort of a week: burning the candle, rushing around, head and heart filled with concerns that have required stoicism and the application of brain power to work through, still require stoicism and brain power to work through. It isn't always easy to find the time to stop and be still when you need to, yet the space to breath, to reflect quietly, to look at the sky and the trees and the birds is an important counter-balance to those weeks that white-water raft you along regardless of whether you want them to or not.

I'm an Aries, not great at slowing down, more prone to busy busy busy from the minute I get up till I lay my head on the pillow at night and on the whole that is how I like to be. I tend to ignore the subtle hints my body gives me of "I'm tired and need to rest" and keep going until I end up feeling like a tube of toothpaste that's been squeezed with the lid on.

It isn't until words and indeed entire trains of thought disappear from my head that I know I'll have to retreat to the sofa and put my feet up with a mug of boiling water and the biscuit tin at hand for the afternoon to recoup vital energy.

Really? At midday? Are you sure?

It does work, even if I'm usually off racing around again the next day rather than pacing myself like a sensible creature would. M despairs of me, but it is just the way I am.

Of course there are longer-term feelings of  squeezed toothpastedness or disconnected fuzzy headedness which require more than an afternoon on the sofa to put right. Below is a meditation I was taught years ago which can help if the world is pressing too insistently on you.

Go outside and stand on the earth or grass (if not a carpet will do). Which part of your body can you feel most strongly? Your head? your chest? your feet? 

If it's not your feet then relax, drop your shoulders, be present in that moment and be quietly aware of all the things around you. Allow yourself to begin to feel your breath flowing in and out, gently, simply, effortlessly. Once you're aware of your breath, feel it expanding into your lungs. Allow it to work it's way to the very bottom of your lungs where it collects all the stale air that's got stuck there, then breath it out through your mouth. On the next breath feel the energy flow to the very end of your fingertips. On the breath after that feel it flowing all the way down your legs into the tips of your toes. Know that your breath is re-energising everything and connecting all the component parts of your body into one healthy vibrating whole
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Now stand again and feel which part of your body are you most aware of.  If you still can't feel your feet go back through the breathing exercise again. If you have regained awareness of the soles of your feet and can feel the ground beneath them, I want you to imagine that there are roots growing out of the soles of your feet; healthy, strong roots that go deep into the soil anchoring you and nourishing you and giving you a sense of connection with the earth that you walk upon. These roots won't prevent you moving about, they won't hold you where you don't want to be, instead they are there to steady you and give you a feeling of being grounded that you can call upon whenever you need it.

Stand for a moment or two enjoying the feeling of being rooted and grounded, supported and nourished, of breathing well so that all your organs benefit and your blood is healthy with fresh oxygen and your whole being is vibrating as it should. Now that you feel calm and centred and capable, go forward into your day knowing that you have balance once more and can cope with all that the toothpaste-squeezers might throw at you.

Enjoy the weekend. CT x

4 comments:

  1. Oh how I love your description of squeezed toothpaste. I can so identify with that!

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    1. It does seem to capture the feeling pretty accurately!

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  2. How important it is to stop rushing around for a moment; it's so tempting to keep on finding more things to do.

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    1. Yes, I think most of us are pretty poor at slowing down when we should until we're forced to. I never seem to learn that lesson!

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Thank you for leaving a comment. I always enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply to every one. CT x